Courage and Conscience

Black and White Abolitionists in Boston
Edited by Donald M. Jacobs
Foreword by John Hope Franklin
Distribution: World
Publication date: 3/1/1993
Format: paper 0 pages, 90 b&w photos
8.5 x 10.5
ISBN: 978-0-253-20793-7
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Description

“Written by first-rate scholars, these 10 essays give focus to the antislavery movement in Boston, particularly to the significance of African American abolitionists.” —Choice

“ . . . handsome, lavishly illustrated, and informative . . . ” —The New England Quarterly

“ . . . this work is a thoughtful, long overdue discourse on individual and group accomplishments. It is replete with absorbing illustrations, which when accompanied by insightful essays, depict the courage of those who labored for equality in antebellum Boston.” —Journal of the Early Republic

Until recently little was known of the contributions of African Americans in the antebellum abolition movement. Massachusetts, having granted voting rights early on to black males, was a center of antislavery agitation. Courage and Conscience documents the black activism in 19th-century Boston that was critical to the success of the abolitionist cause.
Published for the Boston Athenaeum

Author Bio

DONALD M. JACOBS, Professor of History at Northeastern University, is the editor of Antebellum Black Newspapers and Index to the American Slave. He is the author of While the Cabots Talked to God: Racial Conflict in Antebellum Boston, the Black Struggle, 1825–1861.

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Table of Contents

Foreword by John Hope Franklin
Preface
Editor’s Preface

One
David Walker and William Lloyd Garrison: Racial Cooperation and the Shaping of Boston Abolition
Donald M. Jacobs

Two
Abolitionism and the Nature of Antebellum Reform
William E. Gienapp

Three
The Art of the Antislavery Movement
Bernard F. Reilly, Jr.

Four
Massachusetts Abolitionists Document the Slave Experience
Robert L. Hall

Five
Boston, Abolition, and the Atlantic World, 1820-1861
James Brewer Stewart

Six
The Affirmation of Manhood: Black Garrisonians in Antebellum Boston
James Oliver Horton and Lois E. Horton

Seven
The Black Presence in the West End of Boston, 1800-1864: A Demographic Map
Adelaide M. Cromwell

Eight
Boston’s Black Churches: Institutional Centers of the Antislavery Movement
Roy E. Finkenbine

Nine
“What If I Am a Woman?” Maria W. Stewart’s Defense of Black Women’s Political Activism
Marilyn Richardson

Ten
Integration versus Separatism: William Cooper Nell’s Role in the Struggle for Equality
Dorothy Porter Wesley

Appendixes
Bibliography
Contributors
Index

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