European Women and the Second British Empire

European Women and the Second British Empire

Margaret Strobel
Distribution: World
Publication date: 5/1/1991
Format: paper 128 pages
ISBN: 978-0-253-20631-2
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Description

“It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era.” —Journal of World History

“Provides a powerful and important analysis foregrounding the ideological construction of whiteness in understandings of gender and sexuality. . . . Margaret Strobel manages to provide a convincing analysis of the contradictory and often challenging space occupied by European women in the project of empire.” —Signs

“Strobel is to be highly commended for an historical analysis that brings critical light to bear on the complex interactions of gender, race, and class that have shadowed both European men’s and women’s participation in colonialism.” —Women and Politics

“ . . . a clear exposition and synthesis . . . In this useful introduction to a new field, Strobel lays out clearly the arguments on which it is built. Her book makes it possible to acquaint students with the initial array of scholarship that is already growing. She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise.” —American Historical Review

Based on the published accounts of travelers and officials' wives, biographies and other materials, this is a lively, fast-paced account of the roles of white women in the British empire, from about 1880 to the recent past. The European women of the second British empire carved out a space for themselves amid the options made available to them by British expansion, but they too were treated as inferiors—the inferior sex within the superior race.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

One Sexuality and Society: The Myth of the Destructive Female

Two Home and Work

Three Information and Policy Mediators: Travelers, Writers, Scholars, and Administrators

Four Missionaries, Reformers, and the Status of Indigenous Women

Conclusion

Notes

References Cited

Index