Navajo Sacred Places

Navajo Sacred Places

Klara Bonsack Kelley and Harris Francis
Distribution: World
Publication date: 11/1/1994
Format: paper 272 pages, 20 b&w photos
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-0-253-20893-4
Bookmark and Share
Paperback
 $19.95  $11.97 
  

 Add to Wish List 

Other formats available:


Buy from Amazon
indiebound

Description

“Kelley and Francis clearly and comprehensivly address a timely topic, illuminating superbly the inexorable linkage between preserving American Indian cultures and protecting sites endowed with spiritual significance.” —Choice

“This is an exceptional ethnography of the Navajos’ relationship to their land . . . ” —The Reader’s Review

“The authors succeed admirably in their goal to investigate Navajo oral traditions in relation to place.” —Raymond J. DeMallie

An engaging blend of anthropological study and firsthand account takes readers into the heart of the Navajo’s struggle to protect their sacred places.

Author Bio

KLARA BONSACK KELLEY is a consulting ethnologist who has lived and studied in Navajo communities for more than seventeen years. Her publications include Navajo Land Use: An Ethnoarchaeological Study and (with Peter Whiteley) Navajoland: Family Settlement and Land Use.

HARRIS FRANCIS is a Navajo, Tachii'nii clan born for Tabaaha clan, who grew up on the Navajo Reservation speaking Navajo and observing traditions in daily use. He is an American Indian Cultural Rights Protection Consultant and co-author of several articles on Navajo cultural rights and sacred places.

Customer Reviews

Comments
There are currently no reviews
Write a review on this title.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part One
Places Important to Navajo People: A Survey of Thirteen Navajo Communities

1. Background
2. The Project to Consult Navajo Communities
3. Interpretation of Results

Part Two
Places Important to Navajo People: Other Studies

4. Other Studies: What They Did and How They Did It
5. Stories and Types of Placed in the Other Studies
6. Perserving the Culture by Preserving the Land: The “Landscape” and “Piecemeal” Approaches
7. The Hidden Reservoir

Part Three
Navajo Customary Landscapes and Development Landscapes

8. What Navajos Say about Cultural Preservation
9. Navajo Endangered Landscapes
10. Endangered Landscapes outside Navajo Jurisdiction

Part Four
Hidden and Manifest Landscapes in Stories

11. Analytical Framework
12. Hidden and Manifest Landscapes in Two Stories
13. A Story about “Where Whiteshell Woman Stopped for Lunch”
14. The Land, the People, and Culture Change

Appendixes
Notes
References
Index

Illustrations follow page 122