God Almighty Make Me Free

God Almighty Make Me Free

Christianity in Preemancipation Jamaica
Shirley C. Gordon
Distribution: Global
Publication date: 10/22/1996
ISBN: 978-0-253-11472-3
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Description

... challenging and important.... the brave hypotheses advanced by Gordon serve to enrich the historiography of West Indian religious history...." —Slavery and Abolition

... an important addition to the previously more prevalent white, Euro-centered missionary history.... Gordon should be commended for her insights into people who left few records. She not only allows their voices to be heard, but uncovers the integrity in their own motivations and contributions." —Sociology of Religion

[H]ere is... the event which made not only the church in Jamaica today what it is but molded the goals, aspirations, and culture into the new history it is." —Horace O. Russell

Jamaican historian Shirley C. Gordon argues that the conversion of slaves to evangelical Christianity was achieved through black and colored proselytizers who linked Christianity to slaves’ growing aspirations for freedom, and freed persons’ desires for socio-political recognition in colonial society.

Author Bio

SHIRLEY C. GORDON is the author of a number of books on Caribbean history, including Caribbean Generations and A Century of West Indian Education. She is also co-editor of Source Book of Bahamian History.

Reviews

““. . . challenging and important. . . . the brave hypotheses advanced by Gordon serve to enrich the historiography of West Indian religious history. . . .” —Slavery and Abolition “. . . an important addition to the previously more prevalent white, Euro-centered missionary history. . . . Gordon should be commended for her insights into people who left few records. She not only allows their voices to be heard, but uncovers the integrity in their own motivations and contributions.” —Sociology of Religion “[H]ere is . . . the event which made not only the church in Jamaica today what it is but molded the goals, aspirations, and culture into the new history it is.” —Horace O. Russell Jamaican historian Shirley C. Gordon argues that the conversion of slaves to evangelical Christianity was achieved through black and colored proselytizers who linked Christianity to slaves’ growing aspirations for freedom, and freed persons’ desires for socio-political recognition in colonial society.”

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Abbreviations and References

1. The Converted and the Converters
2. Estate Slave Converts
3. Black Preachers
4. Responses to European Missionaries
5. The Baptist War and the Colonial Church Union
6. Missionary Values and Social Mobility
7. Freedom is Taken

Notes
Bibliography
Index