Opening the Gates, Second Edition

Opening the Gates, Second Edition

An Anthology of Arab Feminist Writing
Edited by Margot Badran and Miriam Cooke
Distribution: World
Publication date: 09/21/2004
Format: Paperback 1 index
ISBN: 978-0-253-21703-5
Bookmark and Share
Paperback
 $32.00 
  

 Add to Wish List 
Buy from Amazon
indiebound

Description

2005 AAUP Public & Secondary School LibrarySelection

Praise for the first edition:

An impressive collection of more than 50 pieces—essays, poems, folktales, short stories, memoirs, film scripts, lectures/speeches—by Arab women challenging the widely accepted view of Middle Eastern women as submissive non-thinkers to whom feminism is a foreign concept." —Booklist

Anyone interested in good writing should read [Opening the Gates]. Here are first-class stories with the energy and freshness we expect from a beginning." —Doris Lessing, The Independent

This collection of stories, speeches, essays, poems and memoirs bears fierce testimony to a tradition of brave Arab feminist writing in the face of subjugation by a Muslim patriarchy."—Publishers Weekly

This impressive collection of writings by Arab women... represent[s] a powerful series of vignettes by women who were both insightful and gifted, into the lives of women who have lived 'behind the veil' over the last 100 years."—Arab Book World

An expression of indigenous, intrepid feminism in the Arab world."—Ms.

Opening the Gates succeeds not because of its methodology, but because of the stories the women tell."—Voice Literary Supplement

Author Bio

Margot Badran is Edith Kreeger Wolf Distinguished Visiting Professor of Religion and Preceptor at the Institute for the Study of Islamic Thought in Africa at Northwestern University. Her books include Feminists, Islam, and Nation: Gender and the Making of Modern Egypt, as well as Harem Years: The Memoirs of an Egyptian Feminist: Huda Shaarawi, which she translated, edited, and introduced. Her permanent residence is in Cairo, Egypt.

miriam cooke is Professor of Arabic Literature and Culture and Chair of the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature at Duke University. Among her publications are War’s Other Voices: Women Writers on the Lebanese Civil War; Women and the War Story; Women Claim Islam: Creating Islamic Feminism through Literature; and a novel, Hayati, My Life. She lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Reviews

““An impressive collection of more than 50 pieces—essays, poems, folktales, short stories, memoirs, film scripts, lectures/speeches—by Arab women challenging the widely accepted view of Middle Eastern women as submissive non-thinkers to whom feminism is a foreign concept.” —Booklist “Anyone interested in good writing should read [Opening the Gates]. Here are first-class stories with the energy and freshness we expect from a beginning . . . I hope men as well as women will read this admirable collection. It can be read as literature, as sociology; let us hope that soon it will be read as history.” —Doris Lessing, The Independent “An impressive collection . . . The writings are arranged around the themes of awareness, rejection, and activism, and give strong voice to universally held yearnings that brush up against tradition. A valuable anthology that helps bridge the gap in feminist discourse on a global scale.” —Booklist “This collection of stories, speeches, essays, poems and memoirs bears fierce testimony to a tradition of brave Arab feminist writing in the face of subjugation by a Muslim patriarchy.” —Publishers Weekly “ . . . the eclecticism allows the reader to enjoy the individual writers, instead of wading through artificially constructed literary trends. It also gives Opening the Gates an intimate quality that few academic anthologies have. In the end, though, Opening the Gates succeeds not because of its methodology, but because of the stories the women tell.” —Voice Literary Supplement “An expression of indigenous, intrepid feminism in the Arab world.” —Ms. “This impressive collection of writings by Arab women . . . represent[s] a powerful series of vignettes by women who were both insightful and gifted, into the lives of women who have lived ‘behind the veil’ over the last 100 years.” —Arab Book World “The diversity and sophistication of this volume serve not just to challenge Arab patriarchy, but also to eloquently abolish the myth of the submissive, silent Arab woman.” —New Directions for Women “ . . . an excellent introduction to the world of Arab feminism and feminist writings.” —On The Issues Opening the Gates brings together Arab women’s voices from around the world. Some may be familiar—Etel Adnan, Mai Ziyada, Nawal al-Saadawi, and Huda Sharawi; most have never been read in English before. In these wonderfully diverse documents—personal letters, memoirs, speeches, fiction, and poetry, spanning over a century—Arab women eschew their traditional role as silent helpmates and challenge Arab patriarchy with an eloquent refutation of the myth of monolithic Western feminism.”

“The second edition of this highly successful anthology of feminist writings by Arab women-essays, poems, folktales, short stories, memoirs, and speeches-includes a generous selection of texts produced since publication of the first edition in 1990. These new selections expand upon the themes of awareness, rejection, and activism that marked the multiple forms of Arab women's feminist expression over the course of the late 19th and 20th centuries.”

“In this second edition of their anthology, Badran (Northwestern Univ.) and Cooke (Duke Univ.) make available not only the materials that appeared in the 1990 volume but also material written in the decade since. The first edition included some 60 contributions from women across the Arab world, materials representing a century and a half of engagement with women's issues. At a time when the term feminism was still controversial, both in Euro-America and the Middle East, Badran and Cooke emphasized its relevance to Arab women's stories. The original volume was organized according to stages or levels of feminism—with sections titled Awareness, Rejection, Activism—and included poetry, fiction, pamphlets, and public statements. Each document was prefaced with a bio-bibliographical account of its author/s. The present edition retains these features but adds a fourth section, Transitions, which includes similar documents from the 1990s—documents bearing witness to the changes wrought during the decade, both regionally and globally, and their consequences for Arab women's lives at home and in the public sphere. Libraries that do own the previous volume will certainly want this one. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and graduate students.April 2005”
 — B. Harlow, University of Texas at Austin

“As a result, reading this book is a must for anyone interested in feminist studies or gender issues in general, whether a scholar or a member of a broader audience. The book is also very timely as it highlights a new stage in the development of feminisms in Arab societies, and it gets us past divisive or degrading stereotypes that freeze off genuine communication and allow a more positive and accurate image to be built.”
 — Ahram Weekly online

“. . .On finishing this book—the reader can only feel grateful to the editors who have offered her or him this wonderful chance to discover many silenced and veiled voices and who have opened the gates to so many unknown territories. The various texts document the movement of feminisms in the Arab world, proving wrong the common fallacy that Arab women lack awareness of their own rights, and that they have therefore been necessarily influenced and initiated into action by western feminists. This influence, though not denied here, is not exaggerated either. ”

Customer Reviews

Comments
There are currently no reviews
Write a review on this title.


Table of Contents

[to come]