Musical Meaning in Beethoven

Musical Meaning in Beethoven

Markedness, Correlation, and Interpretation
Robert S. Hatten, foreword by David Lidov
Distribution: World
Publication date: 10/20/2004
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 978-0-253-21711-0
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... recommended warmly to theorists and others interested in music, semiotics, and aesthetics." —Choice

Radically departing from nineteenth-century Formalist aesthetics, the author argues that expressive meaning is not extramusical but fundamental to the reconstruction of compositional practice and stylistic understanding, even for the "absolute" works of Beethoven. Musical Meaning in Beethoven offers a fresh approach to the problem of expressive meaning in music.

Author Bio

Robert S. Hatten is Professor of Music Theory in the Indiana University School of Music. He is editor of the series Musical Meaning and Interpretation.

Reviews

““ . . . recommended warmly to theorists and others interested in music, semiotics, and aesthetics.” —Choice Radically departing from nineteenth-century Formalist aesthetics, the author argues that expressive meaning is not extramusical but fundamental to the reconstruction of compositional practice and stylistic understanding, even for the “absolute” works of Beethoven. Musical Meaning in Beethoven offers a fresh approach to the problem of expressive meaning in music.”

“Radically departing from 19th-century Formalist aesthetics, Hatten argues that expressive meaning is not extra musical but fundamental to the reconstruction of compositional practice and stylistic understanding, even for the “absolute” works of Beethoven. "Hatten's interpretations are at times surprisingly poetic in their expression. . . . His work yields novel insights. . . ." —The Semiotic Review of Books “ . . . recommended warmly to theorists and others interested in music, semiotics, and aesthetics.” —Choice”

“This remarkable book should be seized upon by everyone looking to brush up their Ludwig. . . . Written so well, and with so little resort to classical music jargon, that it can be read in short amusing stretchesor long, engrossing sections. Read a few pages and you, too, can be humming him now.”
 — huffingtonpost.com

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Table of Contents

Foreword by David Lidov
Preface

Introduction

Part I. Interpretation and Theory

I. A Case Study for Interpretation
The Third Movement of Op. 106 (Hammerklavier)

II. Correlation, Interpretation, and the Markedness of Oppositions

III. From Topic to Expressive Genre

IV. The Pastoral Expressive Genre
The Four Movements of Op. 101

V. The Thematic Level and the Markedness of Classical Material

VI. Thematic Markedness
The First Movements of Op. 130 and Op. 131

VII. Beyond the Hierarchies of Correlation
Troping, Irony, Levels of Discourse, and Intertextuality

VIII. Analysis and Synthesis
The Cavatina from Op. 130

IX. From the Aesthetic to me Semiotic

X. Further Perspectives on Musical Meaning and Cognition

Conclusion
Appendix: Abnegation and the New Genre
Glossary
Notes
Bibliography
Index of Concepts
Index of Names and Works