Mass Media in Sub-Saharan Africa

Mass Media in Sub-Saharan Africa

Louise M. Bourgault
Distribution: World
Publication date: 06/22/1995
Format: Paperback 1 b&w photos
ISBN: 978-0-253-20938-2
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Description

A Choice Outstanding Academic Book of 1996

Mass Media in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes how historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and stylistic factors have shaped media products in African radio, television, and newspapers. Bourgault investigates three principal influences: the pre-colonial legacy of the oral tradition, the presence of an alienated managerial class, and the domination of African nations by systems based on political patronage. The first two chapters provide the theoretical framework. Subsequent chapters look at the management of the electronic media, radio and television broadcasting in content and practice, the history of print media, and the discourse style found in the press. This work provides a wealth of historical information on media systems, particularly those of the former anglophone and francophone countries, together with recent developments in satellite communication, small-systems technology, and the current move toward decentralization and privatization. Bourgault also considers the political shifts affecting Africa in the 1990s and offers a radical blueprint for more responsive and informative media in the sub-Saharan area.

Author Bio

LOUISE M. BOURGAULT is Professor of Mass Communication at Northern Michigan University, Marquette.

Reviews

““This volume is a significant contribution to the literature on Africa because of its intricate organization, up-to-date information, comprehensiveness, multicultural and multidisciplinary approaches, and story-like relating of both historical and contemporary phenomena.” —Choice “ . . . this is a very good book [with a] panoramic sweep and a detailed treatment that often employs participant observation and other ethnographic research approaches. It is recommended reading for all those interested in African communication and development.” —Media Development “. . . this book is a welcome addition to the field.” —African Studies Review “ . . . stimulating and informative. . . . The book is for everyone interested in African affairs . . . ” —Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly “ . . . an original contribution to the literature in the field.” —Research in African Literatures “Louise Bourgault has produced one of the most insightful books on African media yet published. She traces how the communication styles of African broadcasting have evolved from pre-colonial oral discourses, colonial influences and the difficult years after independence. This is a fascinating book for anyone interested in the relation of culture and broadcasting not only in Africa but througout the developing world.” —Robert White “A refreshingly new perspective on African media production and management practices in historical context. . . . The book is highly readable, entertaining and engaging.” —Keyan Tomaselli Louise Bourgault analyzes how historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and stylistic factors have shaped media products in African radio, television, and newspapers. She investigates three principal influences: the pre-colonial legacy of the oral tradition, the presence of an alienated managerial class, and the domination of African nations by systems based on political patronage.”

“This volume is a significant contribution to the literature on Africa because of its intricate organization, up-to-date information, comprehensiveness, multicultural and multidisciplinary approaches, and story-like relating of both historical and contemporary phenomena.”
 — Choice

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

1 The Precolonial Legacy
2 The Colonial Legacy
3 Broadcast Management
4 Radio Broadcasting
5 Television Broadcasting
6 Colonial History and Postcolonial Developments of the Press
7 Discourse Style, Oral Tradition, and the Question of Freedom in the Press
8 The Flowering of Democracy and the Press in the 1990s
9 Modernization, Development, and the Communitarian Social Agenda

Notes
References Cited
Index