Nietzschean Narratives

Nietzschean Narratives

Gary Shapiro
Distribution: Global
Publication date: 06/22/1989
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 978-0-253-20523-0
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Description

... Shapiro's book is bursting with thoughts, and if one is willing to mine them, one is sure to find items of interest or provocation." —The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism

Taking issue with a widely held view that Nietzsche's writings are essentially fragmentary or aphoristic, Gary Shapiro focuses on the narrative mode that Nietzsche adopted in many of his works. Such themes as eternal recurrence, the question of origins, and the problematics of self-knowledge are reinterpreted in the context of the narratives in which Nietzsche develops or employs them.

Reviews

““ . . . Shapiro's book is bursting with thoughts, and if one is willing to mine them, one is sure to find items of interest or provocation.” —The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism "The strength of Shapiro's approach is shown by his interpretation of 'Zarathustra IV' as a story with a carnivalesque pattern—perhaps the strongest chapter in this thoughtful book." —Philosophy and Literature Taking issue with a widely held view that Nietzsche's writings are essentially fragmentary or aphoristic, Gary Shapiro focuses on the narrative mode that Nietzsche adopted in many of his works. Such themes as eternal recurrence, the question of origins, and the problematics of self-knowledge are reinterpreted in the context of the narratives in which Nietzsche develops or employs them.”

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
References

Introduction: The Philologist’s Stories in the Postal Age

1. How Philosophical Truth Finally Became a Fable

2. Metaphorical Overcoming / Metonymical Strife (Zarathustra I and II)

3. Homecoming, Private Language, and the Fate of the Self (Zarathustra III)

4. Festival, Carnival, and Parody (Zarathustra IV)

5. The Text as Graffito: Historical Semiotics (The Antichrist)

6. How One Becomes What One Is Not (Ecce Homo)

Notes
Index