The Principle of Reason

The Principle of Reason

Martin Heidegger, edited by Martin Heidegger, translated by Reginald Lilly
Distribution: Global
Publication date: 01/22/1996
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 978-0-253-21066-1
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Description

The Principle of Reason, the text of an important and influential lecture course that Martin Heidegger gave in 1955–56, takes as its focal point Leibniz’s principle: nothing is without reason. Heidegger shows here that the principle of reason is in fact a principle of being. Much of his discussion is aimed at bringing his readers to the "leap of thinking," which enables them to grasp the principle of reason as a principle of being. This text presents Heidegger's most extensive reflection on the notion of history and its essence, the Geschick of being, which is considered on of the most important developments in Heidegger's later thought. One of Heidegger's most artfully composed texts, it also contains important discussions of language, translation, reason, objectivity, and technology as well as remarkable readings of Leibniz, Kant, Aristotle, and Goethe, among others.

Author Bio

Reginald Lilly is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Skidmore College and editor of The Ancients and the Moderns.

Reviews

““For admirers of Heidegger, the book is essential; for the curious, it provides a good look at how Heidegger philosophizes.” —Library Journal “This excellent translation will enable readers to appreciate the undeniable importance of Heidegger’s later examination of the principle of sufficient reason.” —International Studies in Philosophy “ . . . excellent translation . . . ” —The Philosopher “Starting from Leibniz’s principle of sufficient reason . . . , Heidegger reflects on the relation of modern and ancient philosophy and of poetry and thinking. . . . an accurate and readable English translation.” —Choice In this text of a lecture course that he gave in 1955-56, Martin Heidegger presents his most extensive reflection on the notion of history and its essence, the Geschick of being, which is considered one of the most important developments in Heidegger's later thought.”

“Starting from Leibniz’s principle of sufficient reason . . . , Heidegger reflects on the relation of modern and ancient philosophy and of poetry and thinking. . . . an accurate and readable English translation.”
 — Choice

“Starting from Leibniz’s principle of sufficient reason . . . , Heidegger reflects on the relation of modern and ancient philosophy and of poetry and thinking. . . . an accurate and readable English translation.”
 — Choice

“Recreates the intellectual footwork necessary for Heidegger’s leap from the terra cognita of modernity into the existential questions of the age of technology.”
 — Michael Heim

“Recreates the intellectual footwork necessary for Heidegger’s leap from the terra cognita of modernity into the existential questions of the age of technology.”
 — Michael Heim

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Table of Contents

Translator’s Introduction
Foreword

Lecture Course

Lecture One
Lecture Two
Lecture Three
Lecture Four
Lecture Five
Lecture Six
Lecture Seven
Lecture Eight
Lecture Nine
Lecture Ten
Lecture Eleven
Lecture Twelve
Lecture Thirteen

Address
The Principle of Reason

Bibliographical Notes
Notes on the Translation
Glossaries