Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland

Patrice M. Dabrowski
Distribution: World
Publication date: 8/31/2004
ISBN: 978-0-253-11028-2
Bookmark and Share
ebook

Available through various retailers

Description

“This book represents the most sophisticated historiographical approach to understanding nation-building. Patrice Dabrowski demonstrates tremendous erudition . . . making brilliant use of contemporary newspapers and journals, as well as archival material.” —Larry Wolff, Boston College, author of Inventing Eastern Europe

Patrice M. Dabrowski investigates the nation-building activities of Poles during the decades preceding World War I, when the stateless Poles were minorities within the empires of Russia, Germany, and Austria-Hungary. Could Poles maintain a sense of national identity, or would they become Germans, Austrians, or Russians? Dabrowski demonstrates that Poles availed themselves of the ability to celebrate anniversaries of past deeds and personages to strengthen their nation from within, providing a ground for a national discourse capable of unifying Poles across political boundaries and social and cultural differences. Public commemorations such as the jubilee of the writer Jozef Kraszewski, the bicentennial of the Relief of Vienna, and the return to Poland of the remains of the poet Adam Mickiewicz are reconstructed here in vivid detail.

Author Bio

Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught at Harvard and Brown Universities and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, where she is working on a multidisciplinary research project entitled “Borderlands: Ethnicity, Identity, and Violence in the Shatter-Zone of Empires since 1848.”

Customer Reviews

Comments
There are currently no reviews
Write a review on this title.


Table of Contents

Introduction

PART ONE: THE EARLY PERIOD

1. Polish Phoenix: The Kraszewski Jubilee of 1879
2. The Relief of Vienna, 1683-1883: Celebrating Victory

PART TWO: THE 'NINETIES

3. Eloquent Ashes: The Translation of Adam Mickiewicz's Remains
4. Poland Has Not Yet Perished: From the Third of May to the Kosciuszko Insurrection
5. Bronzing the Bard: The Mickiewicz Monuments of 1898

PART THREE: THE FIRST YEARS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

6. Teutons versus Slavs? Commemorating the Battle of Grunwald
7. Poles in Arms: Insurrectionary Legacies

Conclusion

Notes
Bibliography